fbpx

Desert Rose

Feb 20, 20210 comments

As we leave our summer months behind us, winter slowly starts to rear its head. The vibrant colours of nature seem to fade as well. But in the dull browns and yellows of the bush, a beautiful flash of pink and white still exists. Kapama Private Game Reserve guests always marvel at the exquisite beauty of this masterpiece when they see it for the first time. This stunning, colourful flower is known as an Impala Lily (scientific name is Adenium multiflorum) or more appropriately the Desert rose.

Kapama impala lily

It remains dormant throughout most of the year, yet blooms at the most unexpected time. In winter! Usually in July but noted to flower late September as well. They are found in areas that have sandy soil in dry woodlands and desert areas.

It has a thick, tuberous underground stem, which helps it survive long periods without any or very little water. In nature, this plant propagates using seeds adapted for wind dispersal due to the silky hairs on the seeds themselves. The Impala lily contains toxic watery milk like white latex found in the leaves and the bark. The Impala lily does not grow exceptionally tall, with sizes ranging from ½ meter up to about 3 meters. However, it tends to be small and shrubby.

There is a traditional use for this beautiful plant which I find remarkable. The impala lily is known in Southern Africa as a source of poison to stun or poison fish. The poison is prepared from the latex in the bark and fleshy parts of the trunk but is always used in combination with other forms of poison.

Once prepared this poison can be used on the tips of hunting arrows to take down smaller animals.
So, if you are planning your safari to Kapama Private Game Reserve between July and September, we have no doubt you will come across the beautiful flashes of pink and white, known as Impala lilies, while out on your game drives or even when you walk through one of our camps.

Story by: Southern Camp Ranger Richard Silinda

 

Covid 19 compliance badge

To view our current special rates and offers visit our website here for all the details.

 It’s time to renew your soul in the African bush, we are ready to welcome you back and give you an experience to last a lifetime!

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Latest news

Winter morning safari

Winter morning safari

It is common for lions to miss most of their hunting attempts. They generally only have a success rate of about 20-30%. It was also low for these particular lions we were watching.

read more
Women’s Month – Kapama’s women guides paving the way

Women’s Month – Kapama’s women guides paving the way

During this Women’s month we honour and pay tribute to our proud female field guides pioneering the path forward for other women to follow in their footsteps. All across Africa female guides are breaking barriers and challenging stereotypes by moving into a male dominated industry.

read more
Sustainable Tourism Development in Africa

Sustainable Tourism Development in Africa

This cook book has been recommended by the World Bank to help Revive Tourism in Africa. The book is dedicated towards not only Tourism but Sustainable Development in Africa and Climate Action initiatives.

read more
Interesting and surprising facts about elephants

Interesting and surprising facts about elephants

For a fully-grown elephant, you can imagine how hot they must be. Elephants have different methods to help cool themselves down. The easiest of course is to stand in the shade but with the African sun that doesn’t always help.

read more
Lions on a Hunt

Lions on a Hunt

So naturally, I turned the game vehicle around and followed the young lions. Much to our great surprise, these lions began to show signs of stalking prey. I turned to my guests and explained the behaviour of these young Lions.

read more

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This